The Latest: Patagonia sues over Trump's monuments orderDecember 7, 2017 1:36am

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — The Latest on President Donald Trump's plan to shrink two national parks in Utah (all times local):

6:30 p.m.

Outdoor company Patagonia has sued to block President Donald Trump's cuts to Utah's Bears Ears National Monument.

Patagonia's lawsuit was filed Wednesday night, becoming the fourth legal challenge after Trump announced Monday he would shrink Bear Ears and the Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments in Utah.

The California-based company argues shrinking the monument by 85 percent is an "extreme overreach in authority" and strips much-needed protections from sacred tribal lands. It filed the suit on behalf of several organizations.

The lawsuit came after Patagonia replaced its usual home page with a stark message, "The President Stole Your Land."

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke shot back by saying the claim is "nefarious, false and a lie."

A coalition of five tribes has also sued to preserve Bears Ears. Two lawsuits have been filed to protect Grand Staircase.

___

1:54 a.m.

More lawsuits are expected Wednesday over the Trump administration's plans to shrink several national monuments.

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke and outdoor retail giant Patagonia traded harsh words Tuesday — an opening salvo in an imminent legal battle that could last for years.

On Monday, President Donald Trump ordered drastic reductions to Utah's Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monuments. Three lawsuits had been filed by Tuesday night.

Trump said he was reversing federal overreach by drastically cutting the sprawling monuments named by Democratic presidents. But tribal leaders, environmentalists and others argue the president doesn't have that authority and his move jeopardizes a wealth of Native American artifacts, dinosaur fossils and rugged spaces.

Page 1 of 1

More Stories Like This

Montana Republican gets behind Yellowstone mining banMontana U.S. Rep. Greg Gianforte is sponsoring legislation to withdraw land near Yellowstone National Park from future mining after earlier describing an identical Senate measure as "dead on arrival" in the House
FILE - In this July 30, 2017, file photo, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke speaks during a news conference near Gold Butte National Monument in Bunkerville, Nev. Newly released records show Zinke spent more than $53,000 on three helicopter trips this summer. Records released by the Interior Department show Zinke spent more than $39,000 on a July helicopter tour above two national monuments in Nevada. (Steve Marcus/Las Vegas Sun via AP)
Interior Dept. says 1 in 3 employees report being harassed
In this Dec. 8, 2017 photo, actor and environmental advocate Mark Ruffalo speaks during an interview in Atlanta. Ruffalo said he is disgusted with President Donald Trump’s plan to shrink two sprawling Utah national monuments by nearly two-thirds and said that Trump’s decision was a “slap in the face” to Native Americans. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
Mark Ruffalo is 'disgusted' with Trump's monuments decision
Lawsuit challenges cancellation of farmer fair practice ruleFarmers in Alabama and Nebraska have joined a fair trade group to sue the U.S. Department of Agriculture over the cancellation of rules that would have made it easier for farmers to demand better treatment when they contract with meatpacking companies.
News photographer sues Ohio sheriff's deputy who shot himA federal lawsuit says an Ohio county sheriff's office has withheld information and retaliated against a weekly newspaper after a deputy shot a news photographer setting up to take a photo of a traffic stop
Venezuela quickly resolves financial dispute with ChinaVenezuela's cash-strapped government has quickly settled a lawsuit filed by a state-run Chinese company, making good on an unpaid bill and appeasing an important ally that holds billions in the South American country's debt
AdChoices

Related Searches

Related Searches

AdChoices